What Is SIP Trunking?

SIP trunks provide a blend of voice and data traffic over a single IP circuit, dynamically allocating bandwidth to voice calls or data as needed.

November 30, 2017 by Alex Collins, IT Services Consultant

SIP Trunking Explained: The Benefits of VoIP for Business


The clock is ticking for your office phone system: most legacy phone networks simply can't compete with the high quality, practical cost, and flexibility of internet protocol (IP) based systems.
The long-time standard for business telephony has hardware that is costly to install and maintain, and lacks scalability – if demand exceeds capacity, users have no choice but to buy another line.
Compare this with SIP (Session Initiation Protocol) trunking, which dispenses with specialized physical connections, using an existing Internet connection instead to link your calls to the rest of the phone network. SIP trunks provide a blend of voice and data traffic over a single IP circuit, dynamically allocating bandwidth to voice calls or data as needed.
Unlike standard networks, the number of voice connections or volume of data you can carry on your SIP trunk will only be limited by the bandwidth on your Internet connection.

sip-trunking

Why SIP Trunking?


Making the switch to SIP trunking may provide the following benefits:

  • Cost savings. SIP trunks transmit all voice and data via the Internet, minimizing hardware and maintenance costs.

  • Flexibility. Unlike legacy systems' physical connections, SIP trunks permit as many connections as you need, limited only by the available bandwidth. You can respond to changing requirements, easily scaling up or down as needed, by simply requesting a software reconfiguration.

  • Reliability. In case of system failure, SIP trunking reroutes connections to redundant data lines when available, or forwards calls to mobile phones if necessary.

  • Reduced changes. SIP trunks allow users to connect their existing handsets and phone systems to the service – even reusing old phone numbers – so they can make and receive calls as if nothing has changed.

  • Future-proof. SIP trunking systems break through legacy systems' dead end by enabling other communications services: the ability to support FXS, PRI, and T1 connections, and capacity for teleconferencing, instant messaging, and Enhanced 911. The IP-based system can also accommodate yet-to-be-created future technologies down the road.

  • Simplified process. By using a single network connection, a single billing account, and a single point of contact for local and long distance calls, SIP trunking simplifies the overall experience of using and maintaining a telephone system.


Seeing the writing on the wall, major telecom providers have been quietly phasing out their obsolete networks (and support for these networks' users) in favor of fiber-based VOIP systems.